Tips on Shooting Cocktails

20080527 2781-2494

Maybe it is the economy, but I’ve been picking up more cocktail shooting assignments lately so I’ve been spending quite a bit of time studying cocktail photos. The photo to the right is a Mint Julep that I shot last year for Portland Monthly.

Today, I happened upon this great interview (on The Pegu Blog) with photographer Sara Remington discussing her approach to shooting Artisanal Cocktails. For even more great stuff from Sara, see her fantastic blog.

  • http://www.killingtime.com/Pegu/ Doug Winship

    Thanks for the mention, and that’s a great photo.
    I particularly like the drip. Did it happen on its own, or did you give it some help?

  • http://stilllifewith.com L

    Well, it started on it’s own and then I gave it a bit of help.

    Thanks! And thanks for posting such a great interview!

  • http://culinarycory.com culinarycory

    Thanks for the tips on shooting cocktails. Interesting perspective.

  • shirokuma

    I shoot a lot of cocktail photos for blogs (I’m in Tokyo), but sometimes have to shoot them ‘in situ’, so to speak–in the actual bar, under low-light conditions. In those situations, I’m usually unable to bring along much in the way of equipment, and end up with just my Canon G-10 on a tripod–but even the G-10 doesn’t perform too well in these cases, with poor focus a particular problem. Any tips??

  • http://www.davidkiang.com dav

    Shirokuma, use cable release when shooting low light / speed. If you can mirror up the camera (not familiar with G10). Even with the presence of strobe, digital shooting is a bit more touchy than film. It just picks up more and less forgiving.
    L this economy is killing business in Los Angeles … for food / product. New York believes nothing good comes out of the West coast.